Skip to Navigation

Norvik Press

Love and Modernity Turning the Century Time's Disinherited Children

Out of Print

The books listed below are out of print.

Re-Writing the Script: Gender and Community in Elin Wägner
Helena Forsås-Scott
ISBN: 9781870041751
Short Stories
Hjalmar Söderberg, transl. Carl Lofmark
ISBN: 9781870041836
The Beauty of History
Viivi Luik, transl. Hildi Hawkins
ISBN: 9781870041737
We Own the Forests: and Other Poems
Hans Børli, transl. Louis Muinzer
ISBN: 9781870041614
Barbara
Jørgen-Franz Jacobsen, transl. George Johnston
ISBN: 9781870041225
The Poet Who Created Herself: Selected Letters of Edith Södergran
Edith Södergran, transl. Silvester Mazzarella
Silvester Mazzarella (ed.)
ISBN: 9781870041461
Moral Reflections and Epistles
Ludvig Holberg, transl. P M Mitchell
P M Mitchell (ed.)
ISBN: 9781870041164
Lucie
Amalie Skram, transl. Katherine Hanson and Judith Messick
ISBN: 9781870041485
Money
Victoria Benedictsson, transl. Sarah Death
ISBN: 9781870041409
Five Swedish Poets: Kjell Espmark, Lennart Sjögren, Eva Ström, Staffan Söderblom, Werner Aspenström
Robin Fulton (ed.)
ISBN: 9781870041348
The Sharks
Jens Bjørneboe, transl. Esther Greenleaf Mürer
ISBN: 9781870041201
The District Governor's Daughters
Camilla Collett, transl. Kirsten Seaver
ISBN: 9781870041171
New Swedish Plays
Gunilla Anderman (ed.)
ISBN: 9781870041195
The Löwensköld Ring
Selma Lagerlöf, transl. Linda Schenck
ISBN: 9781870041140
New Norwegian Plays
Janet Garton and Henning Sehmsdorf (eds.)
ISBN: 9781870041119
Short Stories
Hjalmar Söderberg, transl. Carl Lofmark
ISBN: 9781870041034
Find us on Facebook

Norvik Press Catalogue 2017
Download our latest Catalogue

Lagerlöf in English
Download details of our series Lagerlöf in English

Special Feature

Jens Bjørneboe's MOMENT OF FREEDOM, translated by Esther Greenleaf Mürer

Jens Bjørneboe: The Trilogy

Jens Bjørneboe's Moment of Freedom (1966), Powderhouse (1969) and The Silence (1974) marked the high point of a controversial literary career. Since the early 1950s this Norwegian iconoclast had been making life difficult for the establishment, attacking its repressive schools, inhumane prisons, corrupt police and power-hungry politicians. Now Bjørneboe turned his attention to a more general problem: the evil inherent in the human race itself. Why, his narrators ask despairingly, does man behave so inhumanely to his fellow creatures?

Top of page

© 2017 Norvik Press Ltd · Department of Scandinavian Studies · University College London · Gower Street · London · WC1E 6BT
E-Mail norvik.press@ucl.ac.uk

Website by Intexta